SOME STRATHEARN SURNAMES AND THEIR ORIGINS

Some Surnames of Strathearn



For those of us engrossed in family history , it is quite usual to become aware of names that keep cropping up in a particular area . Having been involved with Strathearn genealogy for more than a few years I thought it of interest to point out a few that originated locally or are indeed were found in abundance in these airts

TOSHACH :.Strangely enough , those football fans amongst you will yell out “ John Toshack ”. Although the former Welsh captain was a sporting legend in the Valleys , the name actually originated here in Strathearn . Akin to MacKintosh , the Toshacks of Monzievaird were a leading family in the 16th and 17th centuries whilst the Toshacks of Pittenzie were a powerful bunch centuries prior to this . Finlay Toshack of Pittenzie is mentioned in documents in the 1500s whilst one ,Alester McAndro Tossoche .was fined for reset for members of the outlawed Clan Gregor in 1613 !

BROCK : Sometimes spelt Broch ( they lived close by the Pictish stone structures of that name ) and found in Caithness but mainly in the Black Isle of Easter Ross . The first Perthshire Brock recorded seems to have been a Henry Brock in Dunkeld in 1328 . With regard to Strathearn , there was a Joannes Brock in Kinkell in 1663 .

BROUGH : Generally believed to be from Harray in Orkney ( 16th century ) but found in Perthshire from the 16th century ( John Brough in South Kinkell in 1598 ) . Interesting alternative is that many of the Strathearn Broughs were descended from Flemish weavers who came over on the invite of the John Drummond , Earl of Perth and the name is derived from the town of Bruges in Flanders .

HALLEY or HALLY : Helleys were around Perthshire certainly in the late 17th century . There is a William Hally recorded in Perth in 1666 and a John Hally, portioner of Balbrogo in the Diocese of Dunkeld in 1700 .

MCOWAN : Not to be confused with McEwan , the McOwans or McOwens are a sept of the Breadalbane Campbells ( Lawers and Kenmore ) and are found locally often to the west of Crieff around Monzievaird and Comrie

MACROSTIE or MACROSTY or MACCROSTIE : Probably the only Scottish
“ Mac “ without a tartan ! The MacRosties are pure Perthshire . The name is said to have derived from St Drostan a Celtic saint . Found locally in Monzievaird where the ancestors of James of Park fame originated .

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